Five domains of everyday resilience. An image of aDetermined Powerful Black Woman

Resilience is for Everyone

‘Resilience’ is a concept that is frequently associated with extreme sports, combat settings, dangerous environments, or billionaire CEO’s. 

In pop culture, resilience is often depicted as the exclusive outcome of superior genes, a natural talent, the result of torturous training, or as some other mysterious ‘X’ factor that you and I don’t have. 

The fact is, most of us aren’t elite athletes, Navy SEALS or Billionaire CEO’s (sigh). Because of this, it’s hard for us to appreciate that we all can become more resilient.

Here at Wise Seed, we believe that resilience is not just for the elite: It’s for everyone.

Everyday Resilience

Our mission is to help you develop what we call ‘Everyday Resilience’. 

We define everyday resilience as the ability to adapt, respond and thrive despite the adversity that life throws our way. 

Resilience is what we use when withstanding gruelling rounds of chemotherapy, or how we keep it together after we lose our job, or to remain positive during pandemic-related isolation.  Many parts of our lives invariably involve suffering and adversity, making resilience an essential skill for everyone regardless of age, gender, or creed.

Currently, the scientific literature doesn’t fully agree on what ‘resilience’ actually means or how it should be implemented in everyday life (1). What is known is that individual resilience draws upon multiple elements (2) that include a range of physical, psychological, and social components (3). 

Our job at Wise Seed is to cut through all this noise and present you with a system that you can use to improve your life right now. To make resilience accessible to all, we are developing an Everyday Resilience Framework that integrates the latest research findings and best practice into a single holistic approach.

The Five Domains of Everyday Resilience

Everyday Resilience is the combination of five inter-relating domains that we can all access. 

Mind – Understanding and applying well-researched mental frameworks and thinking tools can help you adapt to adversity and better identify positive ways forward (4).

Body – Being fit and healthy relative to your age and circumstance is important. Good health supports all the other resilience domains. In contrast, poor health eats away at your resilience.  For example, it’s hard for your mind to be at its intellectually best if you are always fatigued (4).

Spirit – Our emotions play a strong part in how we react to adversity and integrate its impact on our life (5). When we work to understand our inherent emotionality, we are better positioned to then ‘domesticate’ our negative emotional states and have them work in our favour.

Purpose – Creating a sense of personal purpose is hard, confronting, and sometimes painful.  However, if you create a sense of authentic purpose and work towards achieving it over time, its contribution to your overall resilience is significant (6).

Community – Having a ‘tribe’ of people that provide you with positive support and encourage you to improve is a vital part of facing adversity (8).  In this sense, ‘going it alone’ won’t boost your resilience, contrary to what the movies say.

Each of these domains has its own components, techniques, tools, and outlooks that you can use to cultivate resilience.  Importantly, it’s critical to undertake work across each of the domains to build your resilience cumulatively and efficiently – they all work together and need each other!

Five domains of everyday resilience infographic

Conclusion

We’ll go into more detail on the framework and each of its domains in a series of upcoming articles.  We will explore why each domain is important, what their key components are, and how you can effectively incorporate them into your life. 

We are looking forward to sharing this knowledge with you!

References and Further Reading

1 Snijders, C. et alResilience Against Traumatic Stress: Current Developments and Future Directions. Frontiers in Psychiatry 9 (2018).

2 Zautra, A. J. et al.  Resilience –  A New Definition of Health for People and CommunitiesHandbook of Adult Resilience, 3-29 (2010).

3 Malhi, G. S. et alModelling resilience in adolescence and adversity: a novel framework to inform research and practiceTranslational Psychiatry 9(319) (2019).

4 Jha, A.P., Morrison, A.B., Parker, S.C. et al. Practice Is Protective: Mindfulness Training Promotes Cognitive Resilience in High-Stress Cohorts. Mindfulness8, 46–58 (2017).

5 Alhola, P., & Polo-Kantola, P. Sleep deprivation: Impact on cognitive performanceNeuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 3(5), 553–567. (2007).

6 Shelton, C.D., Hein, S., & Phipps, K.A. Resilience and spirituality: a mixed methods exploration of executive stress.  International Journal of Organizational Analysis, 28(2), 399-416 (2019).

7 Iacoviello, B. M. & Charney, D. S. Psychosocial facets of resilience: implications for preventing posttrauma psychopathology, treating trauma survivors, and enhancing community resilience. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 5(1), (2014).

8 Sipple, L. M. et alHow does social support enhance resilience in the trauma-exposed individualEcology and Society, 20(4). (2015).

Disclaimer

The material displayed on this website is provided without any guarantees, conditions or warranties as to its accuracy.

Information written and expressed on this website is for education purposes and interest only. It is not intended to replace advice from your medical or healthcare professional.

You are encouraged to make your own health care choices based on your own research and in conjunction with your qualified practitioner.

The information provided on this website is not intended to provide a diagnosis, treatment or cure for any diseases. You should seek medical attention before undertaking any diet, exercise, other health program or other procedure described on this website.

To the fullest extent permitted by law we hereby expressly exclude all warranties and other terms which might otherwise be implied by statute, common law or the law of equity and must not be liable for any damages whatsoever, including but without limitation to any direct, indirect, special, consequential, punitive or incidental damages, or damages for loss of use, profits, data or other intangibles, damage to goodwill or reputation, injury or death, or the cost of procurement of substitute goods and services, arising out of or related to the use, inability to use, performance or failures of this website or any linked sites and any materials or information posted on those sites, irrespective of whether such damages were foreseeable or arise in contract, tort, equity, restitution, by statute, at common law or otherwise.

What are the Five Domains of Everyday Resilience?

Mind, Body, Spirit, Purpose and Community. Everyday Resilience is the combination of these five inter-relating domains that we can all access

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David

David

Dave has a highly successful background in the government, corporate, entrepreneurial, and not for profit sectors. All that aside, Dave is best known as a quiet guy with an unembarrassed love of the mountains, a passion for protecting animals, and as being a great support crew for his wife during her marathon running.

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Disrupted sleep increases anxiety and depression. Yoga Nidra is an effective method that has helped many people overcome insomnia.

Beautiful Woman Running On Treadmill

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Emerging research shows that low-intensity cardio is the best way to improve your metabolic and cardiovascular health.

Strong bones, strong brain.

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Regular exercise releases osteocalcin from your bones. Once in circulation, osteocalcin enters your brain to support learning and memory.